Q&A

Now you can send us your questions relating to the mitzvot hatluyos b'aretz and one of the Rabbanim of the Bais Medrash will respond!





  • It depends where the extra tree has grown from. If it grew from the ground, it’s considered a new tree and one would have to wait three years. (Some actually cut it down, so they don’t come to benefit from it by mistake.) If it has grown from the trunk of the tree above ground it is considered part of the same tree, and is therefore not considered orlah.


.

It’s forbidden to plant and forbidden to cultivate, and must be uprooted (even if one doesn’t water it or fertilize it).


.

Halachically, geranium is considered a woody plant. Therefore there is no problem of kelei Hakerem, and it’s permissible to plant it in close proximity to a vineyard.


.

One would need to check with each flour mill. From what we currently know (and this may change, so check from time to time), at the Rubinfeld and Mehudar mills they don’t separate the bran from the flour and so there’s no need to add to the amount. Regarding other mills, one would need to verify directly with them. Generally they separate between 12-18%, and so one would have to add that percentage to the flour.


.

There is a distinction between herbs that are eaten as is and herbs that are used for flavoring. Those who eat parsley, coriander and mint as is should separate terumos and maasros with a bracha. However rosemary and scented geranium are not eaten as is, rather they’re just for flavoring and are removed from the dish prior to its being served, and therefore one does not have to separate terumos and maasros from them. In cases where there is a safeik, such as mint (where one does not normally eat it as is), one should separate terumos and maasros without a bracha.


.

There’s no difference between naturally-grown, gluten-free oat flour and regular flour as regards hafrashas challah. (However flour that has had the gluten removed through processing is different.)


.

If the produce from which he separated teruma or terumas maaser was tevel vadai or safeik tevel, the piece he has separated becomes muktzeh since it’s forbidden to eat, and therefore one may not handle it on Shabbos. (The same would apply to the piece separated for hafrashas challah done with a t’nai.) However if the separated piece is still in his hands, he does not have to put it down immediately but can place it wherever he wishes. If one is separating teruma and maaser only lechumra, from produce purchased with a reliable hechsher, the separated piece is not muktzeh even for those whose custom is to take maaser again.


.

Yes. One can separate terumos and maasros on his tevel produce by making a t’nai.  A t’nai means saying the entire nusach of separating terumos and maasros before Shabbos, but in future tense (for the full nusach as such, see Mishpetei Aretz 19:4). Then, on Shabbos, one would separate teruma and maaser normally.

However, one cannot separate terumos and maasros with a t’nai if he doesn’t own the produce. One can argue that in a hospital setting the fruits are in fact considered “his” since by law the hospital has to provide the patient with food. Nevertheless halachically he’s not considered the owner of the produce. Therefore, HaRav Elyashiv זצ”ל ruled that the patient should go to the mashgiach in charge at the hospital, since he is the hospital’s representative, and should ask his permission to separate teruma and maaser (i.e., as his shaliach). He can then make the t’nai before Shabbos and separate teruma and maaser on Shabbos.

If he’s in a hospital that has a good hechsher on the food but wants to separate terumos and maasros anyhow as an extra hidur, he is allowed to separate trumos and maasros if he made a t’nai before Shabbos.


.

Nowadays, we can define as “poor” anyone who does not earn enough to cover normal living expenses, or is in debt with no way of covering it (i.e., he has no investments). Likewise, someone who usually gets by but is presently contending with irregular expenses that he can’t cover (e.g. medical expenses or marrying off his children), is considered to be poor and one can give him maaser ani.


.

Dough that is made with the intention of giving out small portions so that each girl will bake it at home does not require hafrashas challah. But if the teacher keeps a large enough amount of dough for herself so as to require hafrasha challah, and gives the surplus to the students, she should do hafrashas challah with a bracha and have in mind to exempt the pieces of dough taken home by the students.

(For more information, see Mishpetei Aretz, §Challah, 2:20)


.

1 2 3